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Birmingham Poppy Appeal Launch

Burma - The Forgotten Campaign

The British Campaign to push the Japanese out of Burma was the longest and bloodiest of World War 2. Thousands of miles away from the battles in Western Europe, it's soldiers were often known as the 'Forgotten Army' but those who fought in it would never forget...

The poppy appeal and the subsequent parades and services let those who are no longer with us know they are in our thoughts and enable us to give some support to those who are still willing to fight for freedom and damocracy.

Wear your poppy with pride

I love and miss you Grandad

West India Regiment 1958-1962

West India Regimental Standard 1958 - 1962

The West India Regiment raised in 1795 disbanded in 1927, had their Regimental Standard shipped back to England and presented to King George V. It now forms part of the Royal Collection Trust.

The West India Regiment was reformed in 1958 following the formation of the Federation of the West Indies.

A new Strand of colours incorporating all the insignias, battle honours, traditions and history of previous West India Regiments were commissioned.

Regimental. West India Regiment

Regimental. West India Regiment

A cost cutting exercise saw the amalgamation of the 1st & 2nd West India Regiments. In total, the amalgamated 1st & 2nd WIR had eight sets of Colours presented between 1840 and 1913. The above Regimental Standard is the last of those Colours.

The Regiment paraded for the last time on 31st January 1927 at Up Park Camp, Jamaica. The Regimental Colours were trooped for the last time before being shipped back to England.

Profile of George L Powell

National Service. UK 1959. British West Indian

George Lushington Powell was born in Manchester, Jamaica on 26th September 1934. He spent his childhood and youth in St Elizabeth with his family and became inseparable from his cousin Clifton Mahon, two years his senior.

When Clifton applied to work in the USA in agriculture, it was natural for George to apply, however he failed the farm work test. Upset that his friend had left, he asked the family to pay his passage to England where he could embark of a new career of his own.

Black Drummers of the 29th Regiment

The first mention of black drummers in history is in 1759, when 8 or 10 boys taken at the surrender of Guadeloupe were presented by Admiral Boscawen to his brother who was commanding the 29th at that time.

However, it appears that even if these drummers arrived as slaves, they enjoyed a respectable standing within the regiment and retired as free men.

Further reading can be found at:

http://www.worcestershireregiment.com/black_drummers.php

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