Sharon's blog

Black Drummers of the 29th Regiment

The first mention of black drummers in history is in 1759, when 8 or 10 boys taken at the surrender of Guadeloupe were presented by Admiral Boscawen to his brother who was commanding the 29th at that time.

However, it appears that even if these drummers arrived as slaves, they enjoyed a respectable standing within the regiment and retired as free men.

Further reading can be found at:

http://www.worcestershireregiment.com/black_drummers.php

Commonwealth Day

British Commonwealth family

Empire Day was first introduced in Canadian schools in 1898 and celebrated on the last school day before 24th May, Queen Victoria's birthday.

Empire Day was adopted by the UK in 1904 and extended throughout the countries of the Commonwealth.

In 1958 Empire Day was renamed Commonwealth Day, in accordance with the new post-colonial relationship with the nations of the former Empire.

The Commonwealth of Nations consists of 54 countries across all six inhabited continents.

Jamaican Scientist celebrated in fight against Cancer

Jamaican Scientist Dr Lawrence Williams is being celebrated on the international stage for finding an effective treatment for some types of cancer. Following more than 13 years of study the Jamaican's discovery has the potential to fight various kinds of cancers, including melanoma, lung cancer, and breast cancer.

Read more at http://jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20101202/lead/lead4.html

 

 

 

 

The Real Angels of Mercy

For generations West Indian women have followed a calling to care for the sick and weak. Despite a lack of credit or recognition, we thank you for turning the other cheek.

NANNY OF THE MAROONS possessed a wide knowledge of herbs and other traditional healing methods practiced by African and native Islanders.

"Thank You"

Members of the British & Caribbean Veterans Assocation

Just some of the British & Caribbean Veterans who have fought and continue to fight for democracy and freedom.

Thank You All

One of Britain's forgotten hero's

Jasper Powell. 2nd World War. West Indian

Following America's entry into WW2 in 1941, they made a request to Britain for  workers - under the heading of Manpower & Agriculture on a fixed term appointment.

Britain looked to the Caribbean and in response over 40,000 British West Indians volunteered. Permission granted, they worked in factories and on farms all over the USA. Jasper Powell was one such worker and this is his story....

United we stand

We all have commitments of one sort or another, often leaving us with limited time to do the things we really want to do. However where there is a will there is always a way and over the last few weeks we have utilized our time combining business with pleasure, attending 'Meaningful Meetings' and Networking with Colleagues'.

Hall Green Citizenship Award

H receiving Citizenship Award

Horace receiving his Award for contributions to his local area and the wider community - presented by the Lord Mayor

17th July 2011.

Rev'd David Senior explains...

Horace was involved in speaking at his Uncle's funeral and remarked on his journey on the "Empire Windrush" in 1948. He reflected on the question "Why are West Indians in this Country?" and why there is little evidence and celebration of their contribution to Great Britians welfare and survival.

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